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Myofascial Release

The John Barnes Approach to Holistic Healing

 

Myofascial release (MFR) uses gentle, hands-on pressure to engage the fascial system—the body’s network of connective tissue—to help restore health and balance. A safe therapy that is appropriate for children as well as adults, MFR facilitates the body’s natural ability to release subconscious holding patterns and thus reintegrates the mind and nervous system. The result is significant, positive change that is measurable and functional.

Fascial tissue, comprised of fibers and a gel-like substance, creates web-like, three-dimensional support and protection for every system, muscle, nerve, bone, joint, blood vessel, organ and cell in the body. Myofascial restrictions, which can create intense pressure and tension, occur when the gel-like portion of the fascia loses its flexibility due to physical injury, inflammation, surgery, mental stress, emotional trauma, poor posture or repetitive strain. The body tries to accommodate these restrictions by adjustments in posture, motion and flexibility, but over time, this can cause pain, inflammation, weakness or malfunction, sometimes with symptoms that seem unrelated. MFR can provide a profound and long-term solution.

Occupational, physical, massage and speech therapists can all be trained in MFR. Patients attending their first myofascial release treatment can expect the therapist to evaluate their posture and discuss any proposed treatment. The therapist may work throughout the body or in one specific area, depending upon the individual’s needs

John F. Barnes, an internationally recognized physical therapist, lecturer and author, is a leading authority on MFR and developed an innovative, whole-body approach during his 50 years of experience with the therapy. Treatment using the John Barnes Myofascial Release Approach includes long, slow, sustained holds. The restricted tissue is lightly stretched or lengthened, and this position is maintained for at least two minutes, but often longer. The process is then repeated throughout the body, based on the therapist’s assessment and the client’s experience. Treatment is non-injurious and helps heal mind, body and spirit.

For more information, visit MyofascialRelease.com or http://youtu.be/01jdrGrp4Fo.

Licensed Massage Therapist and Certified Holistic Health Coach Barbara Searles, in practice since 2003, owns Bodyworks Integrative Health, located at 221B Rohrerstown Rd., in Lancaster. For more information or appointments, call 717-509-6262 or visit BodyworksIntegrativeHealth.com.

 

Local Physical Therapy and Bodywork Resources

A Therapeutic Effect, 313D Primrose Lane, Mountville. 717-285-9955. ATherapeuticEffect.com.

Health By Design Natural Clinic, 12 Keystone Court, Leola. 717-556-8103. HealthByDesignNaturally.com.

Mandarin Rose, 25 South Queen Street (Lancaster Marriott at Penn Square, 5th floor), Lancaster. 717-207-407. MandarinRoseSpa.com.

Traditional Acupuncture with Beverly Fornoff, 2938 Columbia Avenue, Suite 302, Lancaster. 717-378-7334. AcupunctureMassageSpa.com.

Jonina Turzi – Functional Manual Physical Therapy and Yoga Instruction. 717-380-3559.

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