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Latin American Tree Bark Improves Diabetes Markers

Extract Helps People with Type 2

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A study from the University of Prague, in the Czech Republic, has found that extracts from the bark of the Hintonia latiflora, a tree grown in Mexico and South America, can help regulate blood glucose levels in people with Type 2 diabetes.

Researchers administered a capsule containing a dry concentrated extract from the plant to 32 subjects with the condition and monitored their blood glucose levels for six months. The subjects experienced an 11 percent decrease in glycated hemoglobin, an indicator that the body can better regulate blood glucose levels during the period, as well as a slight reduction in cholesterol and triglycerides. The researchers also found the natural treatment resulted in a 25 percent reduction in fasting blood glucose levels and a 22 percent reduction in post-meal glucose levels. Liver enzymes showed improved levels in the subjects, as well. No adverse side effects were observed.


This article appears in the May 2017 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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