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Eco IKEA

Designing Cabinets and Chairs Made from Recyclables

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Swedish design firm and retailer IKEA is introducing a new line of “no waste” products that includes seating, vases and kitchen cabinets made of recycled materials. IKEA hopes that the design will help people see waste not as garbage, but as just another material that can be used in creating new and beautiful things.

The Kungsbacka kitchen employs affordable, sustainable supplies that look stylish, including cabinet doors incorporating recycled plastic bottles and recycled wood; the entire cabinet is said to be 99.9 percent recycled.

The Odger chair is 70 percent recycled plastic and 30 percent renewable wood. The design, available in a range of colors and wood finishes, is the result of collaboration between Swedish designers at Form Us With Love and eschews the environment-harming plastics of other chairs.

IKEA also melts recycled glass to turn it into beautiful vases. Each mouth-blown vase is unique, thanks to the materials.


This article appears in the May 2017 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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